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If I want my employer health plan to fail, I’ll — ? (Pt 1) May 15, 2012

Posted by medvision in health data, Healthcare Costs, Healthcare Reform, Insurance Plans, Uncategorized.
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http://waysandmeans.house.gov/News/DocumentSingle.aspx?DocumentID=293471

50% of Americans receive health care coverage through their employers. Much discussion is being focused upon the extent  Obamacare/PPACA will provide financial incentives  facilitating employers to drop health coverage, and thus, sending employees/dependents into state exchanges.

Some of us foresee state exchanges as another term for “standing in the Medicaid line”. The above attachment possibly crosses line into politics and I apologize to those offended. I do believe people exist, on both sides of political spectrum, who don’t favor the elimination of employer-provided health coverage.

Granted, America does have systemic healthcare problems. Plan managers, (benefit managers, HR officials, risk managers and brokers/consultants) have huge influences on the quality and cost of care.

Recently, I’ve run across situations where plan managers appear unconcerned of the impact decisions have on their plans. I sometimes walk away wondering why they elect options of obvious detriment to the plan. Maybe its of value to write about some of the, in my opinion, incoherent decisions I stumble across. I’ll summarize these under: If I want my plan to fail

(1) If I want my plan to fail

I’d make health care purchasing decisions in a way “exactly opposite” from the manner any other goods/services are purchased by my organization. I would accept unrecognizable performance metrics, purchasing proposals by the pound and justify decisions based mainly on what my competitors, down the street. decided to. I’d allow myself to be persuaded this decision is based upon benchmarking. I don’t demand  independent data and am completely unable to measure quality of care been purchased.

(2) If I want my plan to fail:

I’d work exclusively with advisors and consultants lacking the same long-term interests as my organization. The more my plan fails, dysfunctions and produces high cost, the more we pay in compensation.  In sequence with my advisors, we fail to allow vendors/service providers with new ideas/new processes to propose for our business. After all, we only want to do business with the mainline providers who provide average benchmark results!

(3) If I want my plan to fail:

I  execute legal documents composed of provisions, definitions and terms written entirely by the vendor. Rarely do these documents align with promises and provisions made in vendor proposals. Commonly they omit our rights to audit, limit termination rights and  provide no recovery for large financial mistakes. While every other contract, apart from employee benefits, is analyzed for weeks, healthcare provisions are indeed complex and due diligence is accomplished by someone else.

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Cancer is about patients and the community May 5, 2012

Posted by medvision in Cancer Care, Healthcare Costs, Uncategorized.
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America is blessed with wonderful physicians. This oncologist’s article moved me by his description of cancer’s broad impact on care givers, family and loved ones. I took this cancer-care journey with my Mom. From a healthcare perspective, my experience highlighted the importance individual members/patients.

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/04/stop-someones-oncologist.html

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