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What about our national primary-care physician shortage? June 19, 2012

Posted by medvision in health data, Healthcare Costs, Healthcare Reform, Insurance Plans, Uncategorized.
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During America’s healthcare debate, we’ve heard many arguments for and against the various elements included in the president’s PPACA law.

A significant problem, acknowledged by all parties, is the looming shortage of primary care physicians. Primary care physician compensation has been shorted when compared to pay physicians specializing in disease categories, types of patients or methods of treatment. This has resulted in those physicians responsible for treating the whole patient, quarterbacking the complex maze of specialists, testing, procedures and hospital stays, receiving the lowest pay in the hierarchy of physician specialties.

No one should be surprised to learn students in medical school are steering away from the various primary care specialties. Given the reality of a shortage of primary care doctors, the manner in which primary care offices operate can virtually determine “life or death” outcomes for patients. The attached describes this scenario:

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/06/long-waits-access-primary-care-avoidable.html

A necessary solution to long-term primary care woes are mapped out in a program entitled “MD CEO”. Authored by Dr. Scott Conard M.D., a brilliant Dallas Texas-based primary care physician, MD CEO is a process which enables the skills of “physician extenders” to quickly and efficiently serve patients in the doctor’s office for conditions of clear “empirical medicine”. This program aligns the physician’s time to serve patients with conditions requiring “intuitive medicine” while sequentially providing medical leadership serving all patients.

www.themdceo.com

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