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Ominous threat to employer sponsored healthcare July 25, 2012

Posted by medvision in Chronic Disease, Employee Wellness, health data, Healthcare Costs, Healthcare Reform, Insurance Plans, Risk Management, Rx Costs, Uncategorized.
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If your job involves managing employer sponsored health plans, on behalf of employers, there’s an article out (http://tinyurl.com/d836mol) that  says the following:

One in 10 employers plan to drop health benefits.

Employee Health, Wellness, Health Plan, DataI hope this is a huge wake-up call for employers.  Over the past 10 years, I’ve pounded the pavement trying to explain the necessity for plan executives to utilize actionable, independent, member-centric data to manage the financial and clinical aspects of their health plans. Some employers have adopted this model and, as a result, their trend/health inflation has become virtually nonexistent over the past several years. Just look at Med-Vision’s news page for examples.  Many others, however, have declined and are flying, virtually blind.

Let’s think about the impending threat to our current system of healthcare delivered at work. First, which types of employer plans are at the highest risk? To make my point, I’m borrowing from the comedic styling of Georgian funnyman, Jeff Foxworthy:

(1)        If you report to an elected board, commission, mayor or any other type of politician who grovels every few years to be reelected, you might have a problem

(2)        If your annual per employee plan costs are $8,000 plus, versus the penalty of $2000 PEPY to drop coverage, you might have a problem

(3)        If your plan design pays claims for an unlimited maximum, while you attempt to save money by preventing care during the first $10,000 of expense, you might have a problem

(4)        If your plan advisors, broker, consultants tell you your existing 10% trend fits the norm, you might have a problem

(5)        If your plan pays hundreds of thousand dollars annually for disease management and the only result you see is one out of 100 members talking to a nurse, you might have a problem

So, maybe you fall into a few of the top Foxworthy-isms. Believe it or not, this performance can be turned around in as little as a year or two. What do you do?  Here’s my advice:

•           Work with advisors/vendors who win solely when you win. If you’re partnering with a public company, MCO/consultant/broker, look at their financial performance on one of the multiple finance websites. Yahoo finance is a great spot. How is their stock, profits, cash flow performance? If they are succeeding wildly while your plan fails, you probably are not receiving the best advice? Why would you pay more in fees and commission while your plan performs negatively? Pay for performance and zero for failure. Make your advisors stay awake at night worrying about the care/lack of care your members receive. If your plan is failing, yell, scream and threaten firing all vendors. Here’s a nice take-away. MCOs are dumping huge sums of cash into client wellness funds to be selected during bidding competition. If you are humming along with an MCO/TPA, demand some wellness cash!  Ask $40K per thousand employees covered.

•           Are you treating plan reports, performance metrics from your MCO/TPA as gospel? Do you think they report on failures/weaknesses concerning your plan while you pay fat ASO fees? (If so, I have some beautiful, airboat accessible, home sites in the center of the Everglades for you to consider purchasing). This is where plan managers fly blind. Identify and implement services from an independent, patient centric deep data mining company. Analyze health data as a risk manager focusing on prevention, disease mitigation and financial accuracy. Read and analyze your existing employee benefits contracts closely. With your data mining functionality you’ll be able to determine if your plan is paying 2000% markups for cheap generic drugs delivered via mail. PBM performance is an easy way for plans to save $10-$15 PEPM. Ask simple questions like, what percent of our women members are receiving breast cancer screenings past age 50?

•           Where is your health plan money being spent by service category? Plans performing in the top 10% spend over 15% of their total budget on primary care services. The vast majority I see spend less than 10% on primary care.

Furthermore, please don’t be assured a Republican win in November will clear the threat. The “right” wants to remove the corporate tax deductions for employer sponsored healthcare.  An era of employer-driven healthcare reform is needed to mitigate risks and lower costs.

And a last thought. Worry about your plan members receiving appropriate health care services in the same manner you worry about your family members receiving correct care. The higher the quality, the lower the cost!

As Geoffrey Hickson said: “If you forget you have to struggle for improvement you go backward.

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The light of free markets slipping into employer sponsored health care! March 6, 2012

Posted by medvision in Employee Wellness, health data, Healthcare Costs, Insurance Plans, Risk Management, Uncategorized.
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Free market practices appear to breaking through the screens covering our American health care system. Healthcare is a unique marketplace in which our current lack of financial and quality transparency produces high cost and poor clinical outcomes. How many patients will flock to a hospital experiencing 300% increases in cardiac death for heart surgery?  Read this physician’s post: Why we are busier than we’ve ever been.

Self-Funded plan management–take a close look at disease management results February 27, 2012

Posted by medvision in Employee Wellness, health data, Healthcare Costs, Insurance Plans, Risk Management, Uncategorized.
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Recently results of Medicare’s largest commercial disease management study were republished in the New England Journal of Medicine.

This study should refocus plan managers on the issue of disease management because 75% of all plan dollars are spent on chronic disease. Preventing the production of disease and the management of existing disease states is the entire ball game with respect to healthcare. Back to the Medicare pilot. In the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, CMS was required to test the commercial disease management industries services with respect to the Medicare fee-for-service program. The program engaged eight of the industry’s DM providers, 250,000 Medicare beneficiaries with serious cardiovascular disease and spent $400 million over the four-year program. The conclusion was reported: In this large study, commercial disease-management programs using nurse-based call centers achieved only modest improvements in quality-of-care measures, with no demonstrable reduction in the utilization of acute care or the costs of care.

How should this be viewed in today’s environment? I’ve always felt the practice of nurses calling healthcare members they do not know, usually from a different state while attempting to offer advice concerning very personal aspects of one’s health is very problematic. Why? (1) Everyone, especially working folks, have very limited time during home hours (2) Not many are comfortable discussing their health issues with strangers and (3) nurses calling many times have limited, or worse, incorrect data about the medical conditions associated with the member.

My impressions of commercial disease management reports being delivered to clients today seem to be verified by the Medicare study as having, essentially, no positive results. But, Medicare members are very different from commercial health plan members? Yes in some ways, however they are mainly at home available so members have time to speak with nurse managers, this pilot targeted serious states of disease, and still, no demonstrable reduction. In what ways should plan managers react when delivered industry standard reports?

  1.  Don’t allow a 50 page DM document impress. DM providers have a strategy of creating member silos in which they describe all silo members as participants in the plan. A member not complaining about monthly mailings is “not” a participant! How many of us pitch 3/4ths of the mail we receive in the trash can? Probably over 90%. The only participants are the ones in continuous monthly/weekly phone calls with nurse managers. Usually this class never exceeds 1-3% of total members.
  2. Health claims metrics reported by the DM vendor probably will contain positive results. These must be verified from independent data in order to be considered valid. Many times DM providers attempt to “prove the negative’ by claiming their efforts created an absence of claims. Even worse are “vapor” attempts to prove savings by producing some type of productivity gain metrics! Sorry but this business in not akin to a college philosophy class.
  3. Each year $100s of millions are simply wasted on telephonic DM. If you cannot see the results clearly, the result didn’t happen.
  4. If you are offering a sole HDHP don’t assume a short-term claims reductions are necessarily good news. In today’s economic climate many are forgoing important medical care. As water recedes prior to a tsunami, an absence of claims this year may be indicative of an avalanche of future chronic disease.

Now the good news. If it isn’t working, try another approach. I’ve seen clients spend $250K through $500,000 with no clear results. How about using the dollars to hire, through a vendor/or directly, on site full-time nurses to reach out to members, face to face? People trust others they meet, trust and recognize!

The greatest opportunity in healthcare is for employer purchasers of healthcare to start demanding the results they want/need from vendors. Vendors which perform win should be rewarded and the many failing need to be sent packing!

Managing employer sponsored health plans–some good news! January 30, 2012

Posted by medvision in Chronic Disease, health data, Healthcare Costs, Insurance Plans, Risk Management, Uncategorized.
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healthcare data analysisLooking over my prior postings, I seem to have identified some problems. Now let’s highlight solutions starting with the foundation which should guide every plan decision focused upon “mitigating” risk while sequentially improving quality. Define quality anyway you want! Prevented disease, better disease outcomes, enhanced member wellness behaviors, however better quality, “always on aggregate”, means lower cost!

The foundation is an independent, HIPAA compliant, patient-centered database. A quick meaning of independent data:Loaded “flat” files from the TPA which are assembled by a data mining company, not associated with the TPA/MCO claims administrator. We don’t want the administrator to put any spin on data reporting. By omitting elements, highlighting others and changing metrics, virtually any recommendation can be validated.

Also, let’s not discuss normative data. Although sometimes useful to compare performance against peers, let’s not go into rear-view mirror data yet. Here’s a 10K foot look of the process to utilize an actionable database! (1) What are our plan problems/precursors to problems? Why? Because they will repeat in the future. (2) What strategies can be implemented to mitigate these problems? (3) After a strategy/s are decided, how are they implemented and (4) How can we measure the results? (5) Repeat

The market is overrun with data vendors purporting the ability to perform as above. Additionally, some of their “dash boards”, or reporting output look beautiful. If you are dealing with a “top” vendor, a major portion of the sales presentation should be focused upon their ability to quickly and completely scrub healthcare data. To say healthcare data is dirty is akin to describing the condition of the worst gas station bathroom in Panama. MCOs grew by mergers of multiple health plans, each with 1980s-1990 based IT legacy systems. Claims paid in Atlanta are merged with member eligibility sourced in Oakland, each data feed pulled by a different MCO employee each month. Recently my data partner described a site visit to and insurance company claim office as comparing our use of the I Phone S4 to their use of tin cans connected by string. One last time, if the database vendor doesn’t describe data scrubbing as their major challenge, run away!

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